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THE YABU JOURNAL

Kurobuta: The Big Black Pig

BY Sarie Cruz

We have the Brits to thank for Kurobuta.

Originally from England, Black Berkshire pigs are a rare, ancient breed favored by the English royals, constantly keeping a herd of them in the Windsor castle. With a body of black hair and the illusion of socks on their white-haired feet, Black Berkshire pigs have a distinct look and an even more distinct taste. Heavy marbling, a rich flavor, and unparalleled tenderness are what make the meat so special.

“All Kurobuta is Berkshire but not all Berkshire pigs qualify as Kurobuta.” So what is Kurobuta and where does it come from? In the 1800s, the English royals presented a black pig—the literal translation of kurobuta—to the Japanese emperor as a gift. The Japanese loved the Black Berkshire pig so much, they learned how to raise them and how to make them taste even better.

The difference between Kurobuta and Berkshire pigs is that Kurobuta pigs get Japanese-style nutrition and live in a stress-free lives, roaming in farms and munching only natural food. They usually feed on apples, peanuts, clover, and even milk. The quality of their meat gives truth to the old saying, “you are what you eat.” In the Kurobuta’s case, their unique diet is what gives them their unique flavor.

Known as the “Kobe Beef of Pork,” Kurobuta is the best of the best. This is why Yabu has chosen the Kurobuta US Premium Pork Set as its flagship dish. Shipped fresh and frozen from the US, Yabu’s Kurobuta is thawed, refrigerated, and stays cool up until a customer orders the dish. The meat is always at its prime freshness, kept at the right temperature when it’s cooked; breaded and fried to perfection.

Anyone who’s had the privilege to take a sneak peek into Yabu’s kitchen can talk wonders about their Kurobuta. Shipped fresh and frozen from the US, Yabu’s Kurobuta is thawed, refrigerated and stays cool up until it’s ordered. The meat is always at its prime freshness and at the right temperature when it’s cooked. You’ll notice the Kurobuta meat actually looks like beef because it’s so dark and red compared to regular pork which literally pales in comparison.

Yabu prepares their Katsu just the way the Katsu Houses in Japan do, armed with the latest technologies straight from Japan. Coated in flour, egg and breadcrumbs, the katsu is then thrown into a fryer with fresh Canola oil until its golden and crisp. The Panko breadcrumbs they use are made by the chefs at Yabu every morning ensuring its prime state. The cooks let the katsu rest a little once its done, just to let all the flavors seep in and to drain a bit of the oil. After which, it’s sliced and plated and served at once.  The best time to eat your Katsu is precisely when it’s right front of you.